Judge: The racial discrimination lawsuit against PlayStation is weak and not based on facts

In November of last year 2021, a class-action lawsuit was filed by several women against PlayStation alleging wage discrepancies, wrongful termination, moral transgressions, and other cases of sex discrimination at the company’s California offices.

According to a previous report published by Axios, and despite the Japanese company’s attempts to end the case, matters were overridden and a class action lawsuit was embodied against it, after more women filed the same complaint. While the case was originally filed by a former employee.

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Sony’s lawyers denied the allegations and asked the court to dismiss the entire lawsuit, as it asserted that it had not discovered a single practice or procedure in the company that had a discriminatory effect on women. But instead of dropping the case, a number of other women added their names and complaints to the lawsuit, which includes some of their stories and experiences in the PlayStation section.

In the latest developments in the case against the company, Federal Investigative Judge Laurel Blair has dismissed 10 of the 13 cases that former employee Majo brought with 8 other women, but at the same time it gives the advocates another opportunity to present clearer evidence.

Among the dismissed cases, those focused on pay discrimination and harassment, and alleged violations of the Equal Pay Act, where the judge said that the rejected cases did not address sufficient details and facts to prove their case, as the axios website mentioned the reasons for rejecting those cases, which were from Among them:

The ex-employee does not accurately describe her work or how her work was largely equal to that of any man who allegedly paid more than she was paid.

However, former employee Majo continues to accuse Sony of discriminating against female employees for years, paying them lower wages and subjecting them to a male-dominated work culture.

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